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EURATOM

Despite rumours to the contrary, the UK government is now set in its declared determination to leave Euratom at the same time as departing from the EU.

On a political level, maintaining membership of Euratom would entail accepting jurisdiction of the ECJ.

The Government has not demonstrated that it has any desire to consider the absence of legal necessity to leave Euratom at the same time as leaving the EU, or at all. On the other hand, there does also appear to be a gradual recognition of the implications of Euratom exit, including various implications relating to energy security, management of the UK’s nuclear legacy and continued supply of medical isotopes.

It is to be hoped that a sufficient number of Euratom members will have an interest in maintaining a relatively stable UK nuclear industry and will agree to practicable transitional arrangements, allowing the UK sufficient time to develop its own adequate safeguarding arrangements as a basis for negotiation of bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements with the partners on whom the UK relies.

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This article is not intended to constitute legal advice and Prospect Law and Prospect Advisory accepts no responsibility for loss or damage incurred as a result of reliance on its content. Specific legal advice should be taken in relation to any issues or concerns of readers which are raised by this article. 

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For more information, please contact Jonathan Leech and Rupert Cowen on jrl@prospectlaw.co.uk and rcc@prospectlaw.co.uk, or by telephone on 020 7947 5354.

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